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Tag Archives: fun

5 Fun And Mindful Ways To Enjoy Your Daily Tasks


“Our ordinary life is our spiritual life.”
—Barb Schmidt

  1. Greet your day with enthusiasm and gratitude! Before your feet touch the ground say to yourself, “Thank you for the gift of this new day.” You woke up, which is never a given, so you can truly approach the new day with much gratitude! With this grateful heart, go into your morning meditation with enthusiasm, feeling that this day is the best thing that has ever happened to you. Because it really is. This day is a blessing—another incredible opportunity to experience life. Brushing your teeth, showering, getting dressed, preparing breakfast, helping the kids get ready for school, checking emails—all of these everyday tasks are opportunities to live in the present moment and really appreciate that these are the moments that make up your life.
  2. Focus your attention completely on the less than desirable things you have to do. Must you take out the trash…in the rain? We all need to do things we may not want to do, but think about making even the most unpleasant task a mindful experience by placing your undivided attention on every single aspect of that task—for example, shaking the bag to get the garbage to settle, tying the ends of the bag into a knot, then pulling the bag out of the trash bin. Our day is not one long thread; it is made up of moments. When we take it step by step like this, we are making each and every present moment count. This could really make taking out the trash, not a chore, but a meaningful moment. After all, we have no choice; it has to be done so why not be grateful for the opportunity!
  3. Go on a scavenger hunt! Do you have a list of items you need to pick up at the store? Get out a fresh piece of paper and make a list of what you need before you head out. As you place the items in your cart, place a big checkmark next to the item and spend a moment appreciating what it means to you. Is it a bag of fresh lemons, maybe? Think about how those lemons will flavor your tea, and reflect on the gratitude you feel for this sour but delightful fruit. In this way, each thing you cross off your list brings you closer to your goal of finding all the items you need and offers you a chance to really appreciate why they made it to your list in the first place! Making this list keeps you focused, on track, and in the moment. It is so easy to get distracted and use up your valuable energy for the day. Staying focused on your list conserves your energy for the other meaningful things in your life!
  4. Put on a cooking show in your kitchen. Have you ever watched a chef prepare a meal on television? They explain everything they are doing and how the various ingredients add to the flavors and texture of the dish. While you prepare the dinner—even if it is not a gourmet meal—speak to the “camera” as you chop the vegetables for the stir fry, as you prepare the rice for a boil, and so on. If you have children around, this can be a really fun way to instruct them in the preparation of dinner. I recently met Pure Bar founder Veronica Bosgraaf at a Peaceful Mind Peaceful Life event. Her new book Pure Food speaks about being a “Peaceful Chef.” I love her book and this concept so much that I may start cooking—and put on a “show” in my own kitchen!
  5. Clean up to music. When it is time to clean up—whether after the evening meal or anytime when there is straightening up to be done—put on your favorite music and move to the rhythm as you go through the motions of cleaning. Really bring your mind, body, and heart into the task at hand. Chances are you may notice that you are actually having a really good time while taking care of this necessary, boring chore that keeps your home comfortable and welcoming!

Having fun while being mindful of what we are doing really can be as simple as this.

“Find ecstasy in life; the mere sense of living is joy enough.”
―Emily Dickinson


About Barb Schmidt


Barb Schmidt Barb Schmidt is an international best-selling author, businesswoman, philanthropist, and spiritual teacher with over thirty years devoted to spiritual development and research. In 2001, Barb partnered with Florida Atlantic University’s Peace Studies Program to promote dialogue in the greater community on the topic of inner peace. Additionally, she taught a class on meditation and spiritual practices as part of the life-long learning program at Nova University for five years. For the past ten years, she has been offering workshops and classes on spiritual practices throughout the world. A sought-after speaker, Barb regularly lectures at schools and organizations to spread her message of living a meaningful, happy life.

The Practice for Teens


Kids of all ages amaze me. Sometimes they seem wise beyond their years, teaching us adults a thing or two about life. But most often, they need our guidance and our unconditional love to help them make sense of the world and their belonging in it. We can take many steps to ensure their safety and happiness, but I think Ann Landers said it best when she wrote:

“It is not what you do for your children but what you have taught them to do for themselves that will make them successful human beings.”

While there are many lessons we are here to teach our children and they certainly learn much of what they need to know throughout their school years, I absolutely believe there is nothing more important than showing them how to get in touch with their innermost selves. This connection to self is where they will hear the guidance of their hearts, the secrets of their souls, and little by little know deep within that they are magnificent beings in this world.

I’ve had the wonderful opportunity to begin sharing aspects of my book The Practice with students at a high school in my area. In my conversations with these teens, what stands out most to me is that they are all seeking ways to be happy and to deal with what one teen called “the unbearable stress” that comes with being a teenager today. They are bombarded by technology and media messages suggesting that what they are looking for can be found in the newest gadget, other material items, or a coveted accomplishment. They feel that they don’t measure up or that they need to do this or that or even that the life they are leading won’t amount to anything. And, last, they feel scared and hopeless about many of the circumstances surrounding them today.

It’s a search we can all relate to…
I write about my struggles as a teen in the seventies, and although we certainly didn’t have the technology back then that we have today, I know very personally how it feels to be stressed out, unhappy, and wanting to feel smart enough or good enough to fit in. What teenager hasn’t felt this way at some point in their lives? It probably comes with the territory. But what I have discovered since my teenage years in my search for happiness, security, and meaning is that there are tools children of any age can use to access their inner strength and feel accepted by the most important person in their lives: themselves. This will make an extraordinary difference in everything they do.

Using the tools…
Meditation, focused attention, mantra repetition, and reflection are the tools I teach in my workshops and in my book The Practice. An overview of each of these tools is available on my website, and in-depth discussions can be found in my book. These tools are easy to understand and implement, but I work to further simplify them with teens. For instance, I explain mantra repetition as turning to a Focus Phrase first thing in the morning for one minute to start the day and then using it throughout the day during stressful times to reconnect to their inner source of peace, confidence, and courage.

I am so happy to say that kids are really open to these ideas. In my talks, they’ve expressed genuine eagerness to try my suggestion: “Wake up, leave the cell phone for one minute, close your eyes, and focus your attention on your breath. Let the thoughts in your mind come and go and just breathe, connecting to your heart, your soul, your quiet within.”

Kids are just like us—they truly want to feel happy and know they really are okay. I believe that sharing your meditation practice with your children—even just a few minutes a day—and teaching them to connect within will provide a solid foundation from which they can step into the lives they came here to live.

Our kids know how to solve math problems, they’ve experienced the fun and mysteries of reading, and they understand the usefulness of knowing a second language. But, most important, they also must know who they are. They can only discover this with a consistent practice of “checking in with themselves.” Once they have the tools, they can tap into their never-ending source of inspiration, intuition, self-love, self-confidence, and support whenever they need or want to.

I would love to hear your insights on helping our teens live their best life!


About Barb Schmidt


Barb Schmidt Barb Schmidt is an international best-selling author, businesswoman, philanthropist, and spiritual teacher with over thirty years devoted to spiritual development and research. In 2001, Barb partnered with Florida Atlantic University’s Peace Studies Program to promote dialogue in the greater community on the topic of inner peace. Additionally, she taught a class on meditation and spiritual practices as part of the life-long learning program at Nova University for five years. For the past ten years, she has been offering workshops and classes on spiritual practices throughout the world. A sought-after speaker, Barb regularly lectures at schools and organizations to spread her message of living a meaningful, happy life.