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Tag Archives: peace

A Year of The Practice


“It is never too late or too soon. It is when it is supposed to be.”
—Mitch Albom, The Time Keeper

I am so amazed by how quickly time passes. It has now been a year since the May 2014 launch of my book The Practice: Simple Tools for Managing Stress, Finding Inner Peace, and Uncovering Happiness, published by HCI Books. A year . . . unbelievable ! And what an amazing year it has been. I have met so many beautiful people all over this planet. and I have seen what I know to be true: At our core, we are all loving, good human beings.

Reflecting on the speed of this past year brings it straight home to me how fast-paced life can be and just how truly important it is to practice being mindful, being right here in the present moment on a daily basis. This is, after all, what my book and my life’s work is all about.

With my travel, speaking, and studying over the course of this very busy year, I am still thriving and full of energy thanks to the tools of The Practice. I wake up every morning and sit with myself, preparing for the day ahead. And then I use the other tools to keep me rooted in the present moment. This was a once-in-a-lifetime experience, and I did not want to miss a single second!

I stayed connected within each and every moment as I traveled around the country and abroad, sharing my lifelong passion of spreading outer peace through inner peace, at book signings, lectures, interviews, and workshops. When I think about this past year, it is a template for how to truly live every day—not just special days, weeks, or years. I believe the whole point of our lives is to be here in this present moment, open and receptive to what life has for us—fully present. This is easier said than done, for sure, but with a daily practice of connecting within, we can all begin the journey of living our most precious lives with passion and presence.

I am not saying I didn’t feel stress or any of the other emotions we have as human beings during this past year. Of course I did! Rather, I was able to manage any stress or uncomfortable emotions I felt, moment by moment. With a daily practice, we can all learn to stop, take a breath, and start again. We come to understand that we cannot control what’s happening in the outer world, but we can control our responses to what’s happening.

So, if I started to get nervous that no one would show up for the next book signing on the schedule, I would “change the reel of thoughts,” take a deep breath, repeat my Sacred Mantra, and stay in the moment, letting the future moment take care of itself with the deep knowing that I would be okay no matter what. It’s that easy.

We can change our negative, wearisome thoughts into positive, present-moment thoughts. It is this staying in the moment—not letting my thoughts carry me away—that gave me so much energy and reserve to travel, speak, and be at my absolute best all around the world.

5-12-2015-year-of-the-practiceI just returned from the launch of the UK edition of my book. While on tour, I connected with people who share my passion from various cities throughout the UK, concluding with the beautiful Irish city Dublin. It wasn’t all business, though! My beautiful children, Michelle and David, were with me, and we had such a fabulous time together! Here we are in front of a bookstore window, and that’s The Practice behind us!

Souvenir Press, my UK publisher, designed a different cover of my book (which you can see just above Michelle’s head). No matter the packaging—the message is still the same! I would say sort of like people: No matter how we look on the outside, inside we are all incredible human beings who are meant to live magnificent lives.

I offer my love and heartfelt thanks to all of you for making this year so very special for me! Together, we are bringing love, strength, and peace to the world around us every day!


About Barb Schmidt


Barb Schmidt Barb Schmidt is an international best-selling author, businesswoman, philanthropist, and spiritual teacher with over thirty years devoted to spiritual development and research. In 2001, Barb partnered with Florida Atlantic University’s Peace Studies Program to promote dialogue in the greater community on the topic of inner peace. Additionally, she taught a class on meditation and spiritual practices as part of the life-long learning program at Nova University for five years. For the past ten years, she has been offering workshops and classes on spiritual practices throughout the world. A sought-after speaker, Barb regularly lectures at schools and organizations to spread her message of living a meaningful, happy life.

10 Lessons Learned From Women In History


March is National Women’s History Month in the United States, so in honor of the many magnificent women who came before us, I present these 10 lessons for our personal reflection today:

  1. Moment by moment, wherever we are is where we need to be. We learn this comforting lesson from Spanish mystic, philosopher, and saint, Teresa of Ávila (1515–1582). She assures us, “Trust God that you are exactly where you are meant to be.”
  2. American social reformer and feminist Susan B. Anthony (1820–1906) said, “Cautious, careful people always casting about to preserve their reputations . . . can never effect a reform.” The lesson here is that to make change, we must take action despite what others may think of us.
  3. We learn the truth that there is strength in faith from brave women such as African-American abolitionist and humanitarian Harriet Tubman (1820–1913), whose unwavering faith is displayed in these beautiful words: “I said to de Lord, ‘I’m goin’ to hold steady on to you, an’ I know you’ll see me through.”
  4. Physicist and chemist Marie Curie (1867–1934) tells us: “Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained.” Her legacy leaves us with this message: Confidence and perseverance, despite difficulties, are keys to attainment.
  5. An everyday task can be a noble task. No one knew this better than American author, political activist, and lecturer Helen Keller (1880–1968), who is quoted as saying, “I long to accomplish a great and noble task, but it is my chief duty to accomplish small tasks as if they are great and noble.”
  6. Roman Catholic missionary Mother Teresa (1910–1997) dedicated her life to selfless service. Her suggestion that “If you can’t feed a hundred people, then feed just one” reminds us that every little bit counts.
  7. African-American Civil Rights activist Rosa Parks (1913–2005) teaches us that fear arises from uncertainty with these words: “I have learned over the years that when one’s mind is made up, this diminishes fear; knowing what must be done does away with fear.”
  8. Peace can be found in simplicity is an important lesson learned from the incredible woman and peace activist who called herself Peace Pilgrim (1908–1981). She said, “The simplification of life is one of the steps to inner peace. A persistent simplification will create an inner and outer well-being that places harmony in one’s life.”
  9. “Standing in the middle of the road is very dangerous; you get knocked down by the traffic from both sides,” said former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Margaret Thatcher (1925–2013). I believe she is suggesting to us that it is a good idea to have an awareness of where we stand on an issue.
  10. We have greatness within. Thank you to diarist Anne Frank (1929–1945), a young victim of the Holocaust, who left behind such incredible wisdom for one so young. She said, “Everyone has inside him a piece of good news. The good news is that you don’t know how great you can be! How much you can love! What you can accomplish! And what your potential is!”

Thank you to these beautiful souls and to every woman who has made differences great and small. You are showing us the way. I honor you.


About Barb Schmidt


Barb Schmidt Barb Schmidt is an international best-selling author, businesswoman, philanthropist, and spiritual teacher with over thirty years devoted to spiritual development and research. In 2001, Barb partnered with Florida Atlantic University’s Peace Studies Program to promote dialogue in the greater community on the topic of inner peace. Additionally, she taught a class on meditation and spiritual practices as part of the life-long learning program at Nova University for five years. For the past ten years, she has been offering workshops and classes on spiritual practices throughout the world. A sought-after speaker, Barb regularly lectures at schools and organizations to spread her message of living a meaningful, happy life.

4 Steps To Make Your World Dream A Reality


“I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.’”
—Martin Luther King, Jr.

I deeply admire, respect, and have always felt a connection with Martin Luther King, Jr. Both Dr. King and Mahatma Gandhi are my role models and inspiration for the passionate work I do for peace through Peaceful Mind Peaceful Life. This coming Monday, we celebrate and observe King’s life and contributions.

Dr. King had a beautiful dream for America: that all men and women would be treated equally, regardless of race or religion. His dream is alive and well and continues to take shape and form to this day, as we are reminded that we can make great and essential changes in our everyday lives through peaceful means. He says here beautifully, “One is . . . very active spiritually, always seeking ways to persuade the opponent of advantages to the way of love, cooperation, and peace.”

When I was in my twenties, I heard Martin Luther King, Jr., say the following words, and they have remained in my heart all this time and still bring tears to my eyes today:

“A man who hasn’t found something
he is willing to die for is not ready to live.”

Do you have a dream to make an important change in your life that will ultimately impact your larger community? Remember Gandhi said, “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” How can you begin to make that dream a reality?

  1. Write your dream down. Be as specific as possible. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech first addressed the current reality of the situation, and then he addressed the changes he wished to see to bring about a better, more just world. So, what is going on in your life or in the communities around you that you wish to see improved? Begin there.
  2. Share your dream with others. Once your dream is clear, share your ideas with people who are close to you and with others in your community. You may be surprised that there are many people who share your dream or a similar one. The support of others will carry you toward your goal, truly helping you take the first step.
  3. Identify your obstacles. What is stopping your progress? Are some people opposed to making the changes that are necessary for the greater good? Peace activists, such as Martin Luther King, Jr., have set excellent examples for how to approach “opponents” on the path toward making a world dream a reality. They have much inspiration to share in the works they have left behind. Consider reading about how they approached and overcame their obstacles.
  4. Take action. With your dream in hand, spread the word by sharing your ideas with others and align yourself with organizations that have the same goal in mind. You can even start your own local group to begin discussions on how best to approach the change you wish to see in the world.

Peaceful Mind Peaceful Life is committed to creating mindfulness and peace in the world. We are “being the change we wish to see in the world.” Won’t you join this movement for Peace by becoming a Peace Ambassador?


About Barb Schmidt


Barb Schmidt Barb Schmidt is an international best-selling author, businesswoman, philanthropist, and spiritual teacher with over thirty years devoted to spiritual development and research. In 2001, Barb partnered with Florida Atlantic University’s Peace Studies Program to promote dialogue in the greater community on the topic of inner peace. Additionally, she taught a class on meditation and spiritual practices as part of the life-long learning program at Nova University for five years. For the past ten years, she has been offering workshops and classes on spiritual practices throughout the world. A sought-after speaker, Barb regularly lectures at schools and organizations to spread her message of living a meaningful, happy life.

The Spirit of the Season


“Christmas is not a time nor a season, but a state of mind. To cherish peace and goodwill, to be plenteous in mercy, is to have the real spirit of Christmas.”
— Calvin Coolidge

As Christmas Day draws near, I cannot help but feel the excitement of the holiday. I had a difficult childhood, which I speak about in the Preface of my book The Practice, but when I was a little girl, Christmas was always a time of joy and excitement for me—and it continues to be so now that I am an adult!

There is something so grand about Christmas Day that has always made me feel deep within that everything is all right with the world. This hopeful and inspiring message “Peace on earth and good will toward all” has a sort of magical quality that, just by saying it, makes it feel true. But it isn’t magic:

Christmas Day is a reminder to me that peace and good will are truly attainable ideals. They exist within each one of us at all times.

For me, the peaceful feeling that permeates Christmastime is accessible every day of the year when I sit in silence. Within me, all is calm and all is bright, and I feel a deep and beautiful sense of comfort, joy, and benevolence. I carry this deep knowing in my heart following my morning meditation as I move through my day. Whether it is a celebratory occasion or just an “ordinary” day, I recognize the glory in each moment and the opportunity to spread feelings of love, hope, peace, and good cheer.

The messages of Christmas Day assure us that although the world outside may not yet reflect the “perfect light” within each of us, we can shine this loving light outward in all our activities and interactions. As we spread our light, more of us will come together to make peace on earth and good will toward all a new and glorious reality.

I invite you to spend the first few moments of Christmas morning sitting in silence and tapping into your wellspring of peace and good will. Open this gift to yourself and hear the sound of joy whisper from your core. Whatever the day ahead has in store for you, may you greet it with the spirit of the holiday in your heart.

I am wishing all who celebrate this wondrous holiday a very Merry Christmas!
“May you be blessed
With the spirit of the season, which is peace,
The gladness of the season, which is hope,
And the heart of the season, which is love.”
— Irish Christmas Blessing


About Barb Schmidt


Barb Schmidt Barb Schmidt is an international best-selling author, businesswoman, philanthropist, and spiritual teacher with over thirty years devoted to spiritual development and research. In 2001, Barb partnered with Florida Atlantic University’s Peace Studies Program to promote dialogue in the greater community on the topic of inner peace. Additionally, she taught a class on meditation and spiritual practices as part of the life-long learning program at Nova University for five years. For the past ten years, she has been offering workshops and classes on spiritual practices throughout the world. A sought-after speaker, Barb regularly lectures at schools and organizations to spread her message of living a meaningful, happy life.

Winter: A Time To Go Within


“Winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand and for a talk beside the fire: it is the time for home.”
― Edith Sitwell

Brrrr. This has been a cold start to what may seem like a very long winter ahead! In some parts of the world, it might feel like winter has been in full swing for months. However, the Winter Solstice, which officially marks the first day of winter, is still two days away in the Northern Hemisphere! In my post “Autumn: A Time for Letting Go,” I spoke about how fall is the season for letting go—the way a tree releases its leaves in preparation for the cold days to come. Now, I suggest that winter is a time to go within. When we go within, we connect with a quiet inner world that is waiting to warm and comfort us.

In winter, a tree appears desolate and barren from the outside, but there is a richness within and myriad processes taking place that allows the tree to survive and actually thrive in the harshest of conditions. This is what I find so amazing when I see a tree in winter: Everything it needs to survive can be found within. And the beauty is, the same is true for us.

In winter, nature calls us to take a rest. This does not mean we will have less to do, but we are reminded, with the harsh conditions, that we may have to slow down, take more care, and be more mindful and purposeful in our actions to reserve our energy and to use what we have wisely. By sitting with ourselves, in much the way a tree in winter just sits with itself, we turn inward and focus our attention on what is going on deep inside us, on what it is that gives us purpose and meaning. The nourishment that courses through our bodies, the energy that keeps our hearts beating, the light that radiates from our core—these life-giving gifts comfort and warm us even in the darkest and longest nights of the year.

With this image of nature in mind, the next time you sit down to meditate, think of yourself as a tree in winter. While the environment outside may seem harsh, know that inside of you is everything you need to remain grounded, strong, flexible, and nourished. Yes, you are out there in the world, but you are not at the mercy of its conditions. Then, release this image and just be . . . strong, beautiful, and mighty like the tree.


About Barb Schmidt


Barb Schmidt Barb Schmidt is an international best-selling author, businesswoman, philanthropist, and spiritual teacher with over thirty years devoted to spiritual development and research. In 2001, Barb partnered with Florida Atlantic University’s Peace Studies Program to promote dialogue in the greater community on the topic of inner peace. Additionally, she taught a class on meditation and spiritual practices as part of the life-long learning program at Nova University for five years. For the past ten years, she has been offering workshops and classes on spiritual practices throughout the world. A sought-after speaker, Barb regularly lectures at schools and organizations to spread her message of living a meaningful, happy life.

4 Ways to Honor The Light In Others


“It is better to light a candle than curse the darkness.”
—Eleanor Roosevelt

As today is the first day of Hanukkah, I wish all my friends and readers who celebrate the Festival of Lights a beautiful, happy holiday!

A time of celebration most often calls for light in some way or another. Nearly every religion and spiritual tradition places the concept of light or creating light in a role of importance. Consider this: without light there would be only darkness—a mysterious and sometimes frightening place to be—so our love and reverence for that which brightens our lives makes perfect sense.

I believe we each have a light within us—a light we connect with by sitting quietly with ourselves every day. When we feel lost or afraid, this light reminds us we are not alone, and the silence helps us listen to the “whisperings of our hearts.” Our light is our essence in the world. I am deeply moved by the Sanskrit phrase Namaste, which means, “The light within me honors the light within you.” Here are four beautiful ways we can honor the light in others.

  1. Connect with the light within you. Sitting in silence each morning helps you connect within to your “true self.” This quiet time is a place of love, peace, courage, and support. It lights up the magnificent being that you are. It helps you to see the world as well as yourself more clearly.
  2. Take that light out into the world. When you have connected with your inner light, you take your light with you as you go about your day. If you perceive it dimming (it never really does, but you may be feeling a lack of energy), simply breathe and bring yourself back to the present moment and repeat your Sacred Mantra or a positive affirmation, reminding you of who you really are.
  3. Use your light to see the light in others. When you shine your light, you are able to see others more clearly, and you understand deeply that each of us is doing our best and that we all share the ultimate goal to be happy. Patience, gratitude, tolerance, acceptance, presence, and love are the gifts you give to others and yourself when you recognize the light in them.
  4. Acknowledge the light in others. By treating others with kindness and compassion, you are acknowledging that they are sacred beings with whom you share this planet. A smile, a helping hand, a nod of the head, a comforting pat . . . these are just a few of the ways you can let others know that you respect and honor their presence in your life.

The Festival of Lights continues for eight days, and over the course of the year, there will be many more celebratory opportunities, as well as solemn occasions, for lighting candles. Regardless of the spiritual tradition or religion, with each candle that is lit, let it be a reminder of the bright spark within each one of us that provides a steady glow of peace, love, and happiness.


About Barb Schmidt


Barb Schmidt Barb Schmidt is an international best-selling author, businesswoman, philanthropist, and spiritual teacher with over thirty years devoted to spiritual development and research. In 2001, Barb partnered with Florida Atlantic University’s Peace Studies Program to promote dialogue in the greater community on the topic of inner peace. Additionally, she taught a class on meditation and spiritual practices as part of the life-long learning program at Nova University for five years. For the past ten years, she has been offering workshops and classes on spiritual practices throughout the world. A sought-after speaker, Barb regularly lectures at schools and organizations to spread her message of living a meaningful, happy life.

Focusing Our Attention On Human Rights


“Everyone has a right to peaceful coexistence, the basic personal freedoms, the alleviation of suffering, and the opportunity to lead a productive life.”
—Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter

Tomorrow is Human Rights Day. This day, which was established by the UN General Assembly in 1950, is a wonderful reminder to each of us to devote some of our Focused Attention throughout the year to the worldwide pursuit of personal freedom and justice. It marks the anniversary of the presentation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which can be read in English by following this link: www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/.

Boutros Boutros-Ghali, the sixth UN Secretary-General, stated, “It has long been recognized that an essential element in protecting human rights was a widespread knowledge among the population of what their rights are and how they can be defended.” I wonder just how many of the world’s population have had a chance to read this all-important declaration, but more importantly, how many are sadly denied these rights across the planet and how many live in fear of our fellow human beings rather than in peaceful cohabitation.

Our world has human rights organizations and movements both on national and and international levels, and we each have the opportunity to devote some of our resources to them if we choose. These large-scale steps toward peace, freedom, and justice are all meaningful and purposeful endeavors. Every effort counts, big and small, from our homes and in our communities—it all matters very much.

Our first step toward change can be as simple as acknowledging the rights of others to do and be what and who they are without prejudice or judgment—even when we might not agree with them. We are faced every day with people who have different ideas, traditions, styles, and personalities. What would happen if we cultivated the habit of honoring all people’s rights to their own viewpoints and actions? A ripple effect of allowing differences would reach our children and teach them to approach others with tolerance and compassion as they move through our world, and one day we will all live in peace, harmony, and freedom.

Having tolerance and compassion does not mean turning a blind eye toward injustice. When we talk about accepting others, it is not about condoning the behavior of an individual or a group if it violates one or more of the basic human rights of another. This is precisely why the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is so essential in our understanding of what constitutes a human right: that which we are utterly and unequivocally each entitled to throughout our lifetimes.

His Holiness the Dalai Llama says, “All human beings, whatever their cultural or historical background, suffer when they are intimidated, imprisoned or tortured . . . We must, therefore, insist on a global consensus, not only on the need to respect human rights worldwide, but also on the definition of these rights . . . for it is the inherent nature of all human beings to yearn for freedom, equality and dignity, and they have an equal right to achieve that.”

So, on this eve of Human Rights Day, I would like to invite you to spend a little quiet time feeling in your heart what this idea of human rights means to you. I founded the non-profit Peaceful Mind Peaceful Life as a movement dedicated to bringing together human beings through love, compassion, empowerment, and strength. Join the movement today and become a Peace Ambassador dedicated to the pursuit of outer peace through inner peace.


About Barb Schmidt


Barb Schmidt Barb Schmidt is an international best-selling author, businesswoman, philanthropist, and spiritual teacher with over thirty years devoted to spiritual development and research. In 2001, Barb partnered with Florida Atlantic University’s Peace Studies Program to promote dialogue in the greater community on the topic of inner peace. Additionally, she taught a class on meditation and spiritual practices as part of the life-long learning program at Nova University for five years. For the past ten years, she has been offering workshops and classes on spiritual practices throughout the world. A sought-after speaker, Barb regularly lectures at schools and organizations to spread her message of living a meaningful, happy life.

10 Tips For Stress-Free Holidays


For many of us, December is a busy month. From gift shopping and the kids’ winter break to holiday gatherings, party planning, family celebrations, travel arrangements, and end-of-year deadlines—so much of what we do this month feels out of the ordinary for our usual routines. And everyday routines are often very busy to begin with! As joyous as the holidays are, the truth is, they do add more stress into our December days. So here are my 10 tips for keeping your holiday stress more manageable and our days more memorable and happy.

  1. Keep a gratitude journal this month.
    Either first thing in the morning or last thing in the evening, write down one thing you are grateful for this holiday season. When you consciously take note of what you are grateful for, your blessings have a way of balancing those stressful feelings.
  2. Begin your day in silence.
    When you “wake up and stop” first thing in the morning by sitting in silence for 5 minutes, you give yourself the chance to connect with the spirit of the holiday—your peace, power, goodwill, and calm within. When the day starts getting hectic or stressful, breathe deeply and remember this connection.
  3. Create a to-do list.
    Make a to-do list for the day in order of priority, including all of the extra tasks and events expected of you. Are you trying to do too much? If so, go ahead and cross off the last thing on your list. If it is at the end, it is low priority and can wait. This gives you a little breathing room to do something relaxing for yourself to counteract the stress of all the hustle and bustle.
  4. Stay present.
    As you transition from one event or moment in your day to the next, instead of letting your mind get carried away with worrying about what needs to get done, bring your mind back to the present moment by focusing on your breath. With all the extra demands on your time during the holidays, your mind will have your thoughts on overdrive if you don’t take the reins and remind yourself, “All is well; just breathe.”
  5. Give up the need to be perfect.
    Give yourself a break and give up the idea of perfection: You don’t have to be the perfect weight, have the prettiest holiday party dress, throw the best party, or give the greatest gifts to feel good about yourself. Embrace who you are, imperfections and all, by being the “perfect” expression of yourself. You can do this by giving every moment your personal best and not comparing yourself to others.
  6. Say no to things you really don’t want to do.
    Do you have to accept every request or invitation you receive during the holidays? Give yourself permission to say no. Really think about what is being asked of you, and if it doesn’t serve your plan for the day or your greatest good in the grander scheme, politely decline. This is like crossing off the last thing on your to-do list. When it comes to invitations and requests for your time, you really do not have “to-do” anything you don’t want to do.
  7. Choose some time not to multitask.
    We generally multitask all the time, but with our hectic holiday schedules, multitasking seems like the only way to get everything done. However, this tends to drain our energy at an even quicker speed: that’s just the opposite of what we want! Instead, identify one area of your life where you can do just one thing, like having a meal. Turn off the TV, put down the phone, and stay off the computer. Notice how much energy you gain from this one-pointed activity—energy for tackling whatever is next on your list.
  8. Make a list and stick to it.
    Especially during the holiday season, it is super important to make a list of what you need at the supermarket and shopping malls so that you can do your shopping efficiently. Efficient shopping equals some downtime for you later. So, as important as having a list is sticking to your list. Too often, we get caught up browsing the aisles, which uses up precious energy and time for the other things we need to do. Keep your mind focused. If you start to wander, take a few breaths and bring yourself back to the moment and back to your list.
  9. Make mealtime family time.
    There’s no better time for you to be mindful than to make your mealtimes family time. The holidays are reminders to be present for each other, so this is an extra reason to sit down together for your meals, no matter what else is going on in everyone’s lives. When you make being together a priority, you set the tone for what is most important in life. This is your opportunity to be there for one another with love and strength. This time sets the tone for the season and is the perfect way to manage the stresses of the day.
  10. End your day in peace.
    Just before bed, unplug from technology and spend a few minutes reading something uplifting and inspirational, perhaps a holiday classic. Think about authors and stories that inspire you and keep a few of these books at your bedside. After you have read for a few minutes, place the book aside and set the intention to end your day in peace. Let go of all worries and fears. The day is over. Nothing can be changed. Giving your mind a rest from thinking about your worries, fears, and plans helps you to have a well-nourished, restful sleep. Starting the new day without past stresses, you find yourself ready to take on any holiday “challenges” in a new light with a fresh mind.

About Barb Schmidt


Barb Schmidt Barb Schmidt is an international best-selling author, businesswoman, philanthropist, and spiritual teacher with over thirty years devoted to spiritual development and research. In 2001, Barb partnered with Florida Atlantic University’s Peace Studies Program to promote dialogue in the greater community on the topic of inner peace. Additionally, she taught a class on meditation and spiritual practices as part of the life-long learning program at Nova University for five years. For the past ten years, she has been offering workshops and classes on spiritual practices throughout the world. A sought-after speaker, Barb regularly lectures at schools and organizations to spread her message of living a meaningful, happy life.

“Teach Your Children Well”


“If we are to teach real peace in this world, and if we are to carry on a real war against war, we shall have to begin with the children.”
—Mahatma Gandhi

“Teach your children well,” wrote Graham Nash of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, and I believe these are some of the wisest words ever written. It has been said that the future belongs to our children, and the future I envision is one where all people—young and old—across the world can live in peace, well-being, and happiness.

My purpose in life is to spread a message of peace to all who will listen. I believe deeply and say regularly, “Outer peace begins with inner peace,” so I teach tools for cultivating inner peace in our lives in my book The Practice. When we feel peaceful, strong, and loving, these feelings permeate everything we do and have a ripple effect on those around us.

Reflecting Peace
We all know that children pick up our vibes and copy our behavior, so what better way to instill in them a sense of inner peace than to reflect that within ourselves? I have had the wonderful opportunity to teach parts of The Practice to high school students in my area and in other workshops geared for young people. I love how receptive they are to the idea that each of us has a steady source of inner peace that we can turn to throughout the day for support. I have even convinced some of them to sit in silence for one minute when they wake up before using the phone or computer!

As a child and a young girl, I didn’t have tools for cultivating inner peace, and so I found myself looking outside to the world for peace and happiness rather than within. It was a long, difficult road for me to find my way “home” to myself. For many, the times feel different in this age of technology and kids really do seem to have more stress and issues facing them; however, the desire for peace, courage, and happiness is never changing.

It Is Never Too Soon to Start a Practice
Whether or not you call it meditation, it is never too soon to teach children the idea of sitting quietly with themselves first thing in the morning and learning to allow their thoughts to come and go without judgment or engagement to start their day at their best.

Helping your child select a Sacred Mantra—or as I often call it with students, a Focus Phrase—gives them a positive, calming word or phrase to turn to when they are feeling stressed, scared, angry, or sad throughout the day.

As the day comes to a close, teaching your child how to reflect briefly on the day and then leaving it in peace can help them sleep more soundly, knowing that they did the best they could.

Teaching young people these three simple tools and helping them to develop a regular practice of using them will lead to a cultivation of their inner sense of peace. The vibe and message they will be sharing out in the world will be one of peace and love. How amazing it is that their generation has the potential to become the generation that brought light to all.


About Barb Schmidt


Barb Schmidt Barb Schmidt is an international best-selling author, businesswoman, philanthropist, and spiritual teacher with over thirty years devoted to spiritual development and research. In 2001, Barb partnered with Florida Atlantic University’s Peace Studies Program to promote dialogue in the greater community on the topic of inner peace. Additionally, she taught a class on meditation and spiritual practices as part of the life-long learning program at Nova University for five years. For the past ten years, she has been offering workshops and classes on spiritual practices throughout the world. A sought-after speaker, Barb regularly lectures at schools and organizations to spread her message of living a meaningful, happy life.

6 Tips For Making Your Health A Priority This Season


“To keep the body in good health is a duty…otherwise we shall not be able to keep our mind strong and clear.”
—Buddha

In the upcoming months—from Thanksgiving Day to New Year’s Day—we will have plenty of opportunities to enjoy celebratory feasts and activities. These special times of the year are often filled with precious moments as we spend quality time with our family and friends. These memories, in large part, are what give meaning to our lives, showing us how blessed we are to have opportunities to give our Focused Attention to those we love.

So with this feeling of gratitude in our hearts, wouldn’t it be important to show up for these moments in the best of health? Our bodies are the vehicles that support us and give us strength. To be in the best health possible is a daily practice. So, as this holiday season approaches, consider making good health a priority by trying out the tips below. Know that if you are taking care of yourself, you will be giving those around you a priceless gift—your presence in mind, body, and spirit.

  1. Get your body moving. Physical activity doesn’t have to be strenuous, but it does have to be consistent for good health. Stretching, walking, yoga, bicycling, tai chi, swimming—these are all low-impact activities that keep your joints nimble and your muscles toned. Start small, try a few different activities, maybe 10 minutes a day, and settle into one that you enjoy. Remember, moving every day is the key, so commit to spending some time moving your body.
  2. Make healthy food choices. The holidays can be our most challenging times when it comes to food. We will most definitely encounter high-calorie meals and out-of-the-ordinary desserts. For me, this is a time to really make an effort to be mindful and know at each moment that I have a choice. It can be easy to fall into automatic pilot and just eat whatever is placed in front of us. The point is to consciously make the choice to have that second helping or just half of that outrageous dessert. Be in the moment, knowing that you have the power to make smart choices around food. Your body will thank you!
  3. Give up an unhealthy habit. Is there something in your life that you know is not healthy for you? Whatever it is, contemplate a plan to kick whatever “habit” it is. Maybe it is an addiction like smoking. Did you know that November 20 is the Great American Smokeout? That’s just two days from now! Days like this are reminders that we are never alone. There is a tremendous amount of support out there—you just need to ask for it.
  4. Replenish your body. Our bodies are made up of mostly water. In fact, we come into this world from a “sac of water.” So it makes sense that when we spend time in and around water we feel an overall sense of well-being. When I get into a bathtub, my first response is, Ahhh. That’s my body’s way of saying thank you. So replenish your body with this life-giving gift. For instance, take a warm bath, nurture your body with a tall glass of fresh water several times a day, or if weather permits, go to the beach or a lake.
  5. Sleep well. Do you have too much to do to get a full night’s sleep? The importance of sleep is in the media a lot lately, and I am very happy about that. When it comes to sleep, I know that if I don’t get enough, it is difficult for me to be at my best for the day ahead. Figure out the best sleep schedule for you, and make every effort to stick to it. If time is short, make it a point to take on just one less thing so that you can get your adequate amount of sleep.
  6. Smile and laugh. I say often, “Don’t take life so seriously, but be serious about the life you’re living.” See the humorous side of things as often as you can. Lighten up! Don’t take things personally; it really is not about YOU! When you make the decision to have a daily practice that nurtures your body as well as your mind, your practice will translate into your life as a deep, beautiful, light spirit that finds not only peace and joy in everyday moments but humor too!

About Barb Schmidt


Barb Schmidt Barb Schmidt is an international best-selling author, businesswoman, philanthropist, and spiritual teacher with over thirty years devoted to spiritual development and research. In 2001, Barb partnered with Florida Atlantic University’s Peace Studies Program to promote dialogue in the greater community on the topic of inner peace. Additionally, she taught a class on meditation and spiritual practices as part of the life-long learning program at Nova University for five years. For the past ten years, she has been offering workshops and classes on spiritual practices throughout the world. A sought-after speaker, Barb regularly lectures at schools and organizations to spread her message of living a meaningful, happy life.